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Lymphoma

Multiple Myeloma

What Is Meant By Lymphoma?

Lymphoma is cancer that begins in infection-fighting cells of the immune system, called lymphocytes. These cells are in the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, bone marrow, and other parts of the body. When you have lymphoma, lymphocytes change and grow out of control.
There are two main types of lymphoma:
Non-Hodgkin: Most people with lymphoma have this type.
Hodgkin
Non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma involve different types of lymphocyte cells. Every type of
lymphoma grows at a different rate and responds differently to treatment.
Lymphoma is very treatable, and the outlook can vary depending on the type of lymphoma and its stage. Your doctor can help you find the right treatment for your type and stage of the illness.
Lymphoma is different from leukemia. Each of these cancers starts in a different type of cell.
Lymphoma starts in infection-fighting lymphocytes.
Leukemia starts in blood-forming cells inside bone marrow.

What are the symptoms of Lymphoma?
Signs and symptoms of lymphoma may include:
Painless swelling of lymph nodes in your neck, armpits or groin.
Persistent fatigue.
Fever.
Night sweats.
Shortness of breath Unexplained weight loss.
Itchy skin.

What causes Lymphoma?                                                                                              Doctors aren’t sure what causes lymphoma. But it begins when a disease-fighting white blood cell called a lymphocyte develops a genetic mutation. The mutation tells the cell to multiply rapidly, causing many diseased lymphocytes that continue multiplying.
The mutation also allows the cells to go on living when other normal cells would die. This causes too many diseased and ineffective lymphocytes in your lymph nodes and causes the lymph nodes, spleen and liver to swell.

How is to treat Lymphoma?
Lymphoma treatments include:
Active surveillance. Some forms of lymphoma are very slow growing. You and your doctor may decide to wait to treat your lymphoma when it causes signs and symptoms that interfere with your daily activities. Until then, you may undergo periodic tests to monitor your condition.
Chemotherapy. Chemotherapy uses drugs to destroy fast-growing cells, such as cancer cells. The drugs are usually administered through a vein, but can also be taken as a pill, depending on the specific drugs you receive.
Radiation therapy. Radiation therapy uses high-powered beams of energy, such as X-rays and protons, to kill cancer cells.
Bone marrow transplant. A bone marrow transplant, also known as a stem cell transplant, involves using high doses of chemotherapy and radiation to suppress your bone marrow. Then healthy bone marrow stem cells from your body or from a donor are infused into your blood where they travel to your bones and rebuild your
bone marrow.

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